DirecTV and Dish Network Satellite Locations

Legend

DirecTV

DISH Network

Ku-band-BSS

Ku-band-FSS

Ka-band

Phase III Dish

5-LNB Dish KaKu

Dish 500

Super Dish

Dish 1000

How to use:
The numbers across the top are the satellite orbital slots. Use the Legend to find the service using the satellite, the broadcast band, and the type of multi-sat dishes you can use to receive more then one satellite from a single dish. Any satellite can be received with a single satellite dish. Both the Dish Network and DirecTV often require that more then one satellite dish be installed to receive a desired programming package.

Chart of Satellite Information for DirecTV and Dish Network

61.5
72.5
77
95
99
101
103
105
110
110
119
119
121
129
148
DN
DTV
DN
DTV
DTV
DTV
DTV
DN
DN
DTV
DN
DTV
DN
DN
DN
PIII
D500
PIII
D500
PIII
KaKu
KaKu
KaKu
SD
SD
KaKu
SD
KaKu
SD
1000
1000
1000

Satellite Technology Development

The Early Days
In the 1970's and 1980's, satellites became a chief means of long distance radio communication and facilitated worldwide TV program distribution in real time. In rural areas not serviced by terrestrial TV broadcast stations and cable TV systems, satellite signals made possible direct reception of TV from satellites by TVRO receivers equipped with parabolic antennas with diameters between 2 and 5 meters. For almost two decades, TV program delivery by satellites was done in the 4/6 GHz C-band and 11-14 GHz Ku-FSS bands. (FSS-Fixed Satellite Service)

The Emergence of the "Small Dish"
In the early 90's, advancements in radio communications technologies and the offer of a smaller, more marketable "Small Dish TV" paved the way for DirecTV and later, Dish Network. These new Direct Program Providers use a sub-band of Ku-FSS (11-14 GHz), the Broadcast Satellite Service Band (BSS-12.2 to 12.7 GHz). Today, three technologies have been aggressively developed for the BSS: the direct broadcast service (DBS), BSS-HDTV, and BSS-Sound. The frequencies for the DBS uplink (Earth-to-space direction), are allocated in the FSS. Downlink DBS frequencies are allocated in the BSS.

Ku-BSS satellites broadcast at higher powers then the first Ku-FSS satellite. FSS satellites use broadcast powers around 50-60 watts, and are positioned in orbit as close as 2 degrees, relative. BSS satellites, which include the DBS satellites used by DirecTV and Dish Network use broadcast powers as high as 200 watts. This increased power requires the satellites to be spaced at least 9 degrees apart to maintain signal separation when using a smaller dish. Satellite Dishes for FSS Ku-band reception are usually no smaller then 26-36 inches in diameter. DBS Ku-band satellite dishes can operate as small as 14 inches, but 18 inches is considered the smallest dish size for reliable residential use.

The Next Generation
The latest advancements in radio technology and licensing approvals from the FCC have opened the Ka-band market place. Ka-band offers satellite television and broadband providers with increased data transfer rates and increased spot beam control. Currently, only DirecTV has an operational Ka-band satellite for satellite television services. The DirecTV 5-LNB satellite dish receives both Ka and ku satellite television signals. Wildblue, a Satellite Broadband Internet provider, offers a Ka-band Satellite Internet services from the Anik F1 Ka band satellite.

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